Senate Appropriations Committee Includes Aging Biology in its 2013 HHS Budget

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING
Appropriations, 2012 ………………………………………………………………….. $1,121,400,000
Budget estimate, 2013 ………………………………………………………………… 1,102,650,000
Committee recommendation ……………………………………………………….. 1,124,265,000

The Committee recommendation includes $1,124,265,000 for
NIA.

Alzheimer’s Disease.—In order to build upon the strong body of
work already being done in NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research
Centers, the Committee urges NIH to take advantage of existing
well-characterized, longitudinal, population-based cohort
studies and the existing research infrastructure these large-scale
cohort studies have already established to provide new insights
into risk factors and protective factors related to cognitive decline
and dementia. The Committee feels strongly that additional research
is needed in minority populations that are at particularly
high risk for cognitive decline and dementia.

Biology of Aging.—The Committee applauds NIA’s leadership
role in the Geroscience Interest Group, which will promote coordinated
discussion and action across NIH on research to reduce the
burden of age-related disease.

Cognitive Interventions.—The Committee encourages NIA to continue
support of studies to identify environmental, behavioral, and
social factors that could protect against age-related cognitive decline
as well as randomized studies to test the efficacy of behavioral
and social interventions to slow or reverse age-related cognitive
decline.
Demographic Research.—The Committee recognizes NIA for supporting
research on the demographic, economic, and social consequences
of an aging population in the United States and worldwide.
A premier example of this research is the Health and Retirement
Study, a longitudinal survey of more than 26,000 Americans
that is now being replicated in over 30 other countries.
Measurement of Well-Being.—The Committee commends NIA for
working with the Economic and Social Research Council in Great
Britain to develop subjective measures of well-being as a complement
to objective health measures and traditional economic indicators
of progress. The Committee encourages the continued development
of these metrics and their incorporation into national
surveys.
Neuropsychology and Alzheimer’s.—Recognizing that neuropsychological
assessment can provide detailed information about
cognitive deficits related to dementia or trauma, the Committee encourages
NIA to continue research that links neuropsychological
markers with Alzheimer’s biomarkers.

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